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Home > State information on E Collars

Are Electronic and Electric Dog collars legal?


This page is provided as a guide only. We recommend you do your own research in to the information, relevant legislation and Acts regarding the use of Electronic devices on Animals and Dogs in the various states of Australia.

Please read and investigate this information prior to the purchase or use of any dog training devices within your state. The decision to purchase and/or use any training devices and the manner in which they are used rests entirely with the dog owner or person/s in charge of the dog.


Victoria: 

See Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Regulation 1986 – 2008 Amendment - 

An electronic collar is an animal collar that is designed to be capable of imparting an electric shock to an animal. People using electronic collars must comply with legal requirements under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Regulations 2008.
This fact sheet outlines the legal requirements relating to electronic ‘containment collars’, worn by cats or dogs as part of a containment system.
Legal requirements relating to the use of ‘anti-bark collars’, and ‘remote training collars’ for dogs are covered in a separate fact sheet.

General Conditions
You must not use an electronic collar on an animal that is not a dog or cat.
You must only use authorised electronic collars on cats and dogs. In relation to dogs, authorised electronic collars mean a ‘remote training collar’, an ‘anti-bark collar’, or a ‘containment collar. In relation to cats, authorised electronic collars mean a ‘containment collar’.

You must not use an authorised electronic collar unless:

  • A veterinary practitioner has examined the physical health and temperament of the dog or cat and reasonably believes that the dog or cat is suitable to have an authorised electronic collar used on it; and
  • The dog or cat is over 6 months of age; and
  • A collar is not left on the dog or cat for more than 12 hours in any 24 hour period; and
  • The use is in accordance with any instructions for use of the collar provided by the manufacturer; and
  • The dog or cat is introduced to the use of the collar in accordance with a training program that complies with a code of practice made under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act (if any); and
  • The collar complies with the following specifications1: a) the power of the collar must not exceed either 15 milliamps root mean square or 100 milliamps single pulse with a maximum of 3 milliamps per second; and b) the length of the stimulation period must be limited by an automatic safety cut-out; and c) the collar must provide for variable levels of static stimulation; and
  • The collar contacts have safe, rounded points1; and
  • The distance between the collar contact points does not exceed 60 millimetres1.
Specific requirements relating to containment Collars.
‘Containment collar’ means an electric collar that is designed to be worn by an animal as part of a containment system.
‘Containment system’ means a method of containing c area through the use of a boundary wire and transmitter that sends a radio signal to a receiver in a containment collar, which then delivers an electric shock to an animal wearing the collar if it gets too close to the boundary wire.
A person must not use a containment collar on a dog unless the person has ensured that the dog is trained to the use of the containment system and collar by
  • A veterinary practitioner, a qualified dog trainer or competent trainer; or
  • A person under the supervision and written instructions of a veterinary practitioner, a qualified dog trainer or a competent trainer.
A person must not use a containment collar on a cat unless the person has ensured that the cat is trained to the use of the containment system and collar by
  • A veterinary practitioner or competent trainer; or
  • A person under the supervision and written instructions of a veterinary practitioner or a competent trainer.
A ‘qualified dog trainer’ is defined as “a person who meets the requirements of regulation 49(2) of the Domestic (Feral and Nuisance) Animals Regulations 2005”.

A ‘competent trainer’ means a person who is employed by a company that sells containment systems and who is competent to conduct a containment system training program for dogs or cats that complies with the relevant Code of Practice (if any).


Specific legal requirements relating to anti bark and remote training collars for dogs

An anti-bark collar means an electric collar designed to modify barking behaviour in dogs, and that is activated by a dog’s bark.

A remote training collar means an electric collar that is designed to be worn by an animal to assist in modification of the animal’s behaviour, and that is activated by a person through a transmitter.

You must not put a remote training collar or anti-bark collar on a dog unless you are:

  • A veterinary practitioner or a qualified dog trainer; or
  • Acting under the supervision and written instructions of a veterinary practitioner or a qualified dog trainer.
If you are acting under the supervision and written instructions of a veterinary practitioner or a qualifi ed dog trainer, they must review the use of the collar:

  • Within 6 months of the initial physical health and temperament assessment of the dog (i.e. the assessment that was done to confi rm the suitability of using an electronic collar on the animal)
  • At least every 12 months after the fi rst review.
Note that ‘qualified dog trainer’ is defined as “a person who meets the requirements of regulation 49(2) of the Domestic (Feral and Nuisance) Animals Regulations 2005”.


Queensland: 

Animal Care & Protection Act 2001. (under review) No specific restrictions have been found.


New South Wales: Prevention of Cruelty to Animal Act 1979 – 2000. 

Electronic Bark Collar and Remote training collars - Not allowed.

Dog Containment system Amendment you may use these barriers provided that it be: ”...used inside a fence through which animals cannot pass and that is not less than 1.5m high.”


Western Australia: Animal Welfare Act 2002. Ok to be used on Dogs- The Dog Act provides for the proper use of these products. The cat act does not yet mention the use of these products.

South Australia: Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Regulations 1985 – 2000 Amendments. A person must not place on an animal a collar designed to impart an electric shock.

ACT: 

ACT Animal Welfare Act 1992 – 2001 Amendments. Not allowed

Northern Territory: 

Animal Welfare Act 1999 – 2005. Unless authorised by a law in force in the Territory, a person must not use an electrical device on an animal.

Tasmania: 

Animal Welfare Act 1993. (under review) No specific restrictions found.




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